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Courses

 

Spring 2018 Undergraduate Course Descriptions

University Registration Guidelines Website:  Link to Registrar

COL 233: Literature & Happiness
Approved for SUNY Humanities requirement
Aykun Ozgen
Class #24724
MWF 10:00-10:50am
Location: TBA

We all want to be happy. But what is happiness? This course will investigate the answers given to this question. We will be reading, writing and talking about a wide variety of short texts from different fields such as art and literature, journalism, neuroscience, philosophy, psychology, religion, and sociology. We will study visual media as well. Through literary and philosophical analysis, some of the questions we will try to answer will be the following: What makes us happy? Do we deserve to be happy? Can we create our own happiness? What is the relationship between happiness, virtues, pleasure, money, and friendship?


COL 200: Democracy & Justice in America
Thematic Pathway
Professor David E. Johnson
Class #23130
Tuesday & Thursday 12:30-1:20, and recitation
114 Hochstetter

This course explores issues central to democracy. First, it examines the relation between democracy’s claim to protect and promote both universal freedom and universal equality. Second, it considers the unresolvable tension between popular sovereignty (“we”) and individual rights (“I”). Third, it considers the limitation of democracy in its necessary calculus of citizenship, the dual question of both how to count and who counts. Fourth the course takes up the role of narrative (recounting and accounting, telling) in establishing citizenship and the tradition or legacy of democracy. The course focuses on detailed readings and discussions of founding and foundational documents of the United States’ democratic experiment: declaration of independence, articles of confederation, constitution of the United States, debates on the constitution; writings of Jefferson, Douglass, Lincoln, Stanton and Anthony, Larsen, MLK, Morrison; and major supreme court decisions concerning citizenship, racial equality, reproductive rights, rights to privacy, same sex marriage. In sum, “We the people” asks what it means to be a citizen and why democracy is at once the worst and the best form of government. In sum, in its consideration of the language of democracy–of citizenship and rights–“We the People” asks what it means when African-American novelist Toni Morrison remarks, in Beloved, that the story of slavery and of a mother’s desire to “free” her daughter is “not” one “to pass on.” What does it mean not “to pass on” the haunted narrative of our cultural and legal inheritance?

COL 112: Cross-Cultural Explorations
Thematic Pathway
Professor Ewa Ziarek
Class #21857
MW 4:00-4:50pm, and recitation
110 Knox

The principal objective of this course is the study of the diversity of Western, East Asian, and African cultures from the Renaissance to the Modern Age. Although we will explore cultural diversity in its various expressions; in politics, religious thought, social customs, everyday beliefs, and scientific advances; our primary focus will be the study of art, literature, and big ideas. One of the central concerns of this course will be different cultural and historical conceptions of the human and its relation to nature, politics, and science. In the first part of the course we will examine the different formations of humanism in the Western cultures from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment; from Romanticism to Marxism.   In the second part of the course we will focus on the non-Western ideas of the human and humanity and their expression in religions, political organizations, and artworks. We will begin with Daoism and Confucianism and their impact on Chinese ethics, philosophy, politics, and culture during the Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1911) Dynasties. We will also briefly discuss the Cultural Revolution and Maoism in 20th century China. We will follow the influence of Confucianism in Japanese culture and its confluence with Zen and the Shinto Revival. In the context of politics we will focus primarily on the Tokugawa Shogunate. In the context of the arts we will analyze the place of the human in nature as reflected in Japanese landscape paintings, poetry, and woodblock prints. We will conclude our course with the discussion of the devastation of colonialism and the struggle for independence in Africa. We will analyze the influence of traditional (for example, masks and music) and modern African cultures (Fanon, Achebe, and Soyinka) in the contemporary world.